80 percent of organizations have suffered a severe cloud

A new report finds 80 percent of organizations have experienced at least one severe cloud security incident in the past year, and 41 percent say cloud native services increase complexity, further complicating their security efforts

On a positive note though the study, from developer security specialist Snyk, shows 49 percent of organizations now find deployment is faster as a result of improved cloud security.

“This new research should serve as a wake-up call that our collective cloud security risk is universal and will only continue to grow if we double down on outdated approaches and legacy tools,” says Josh Stella, vice president and chief architect at Snyk. “The outlook is not entirely dire, however, as the data also clearly reveals that shifting cloud security left and embracing DevSecOps collaboration can allow global organizations to continue their current pace of innovation more securely.”

Startups (89 percent) and public sector organizations (88 percent) were most impacted. On the other hand, enterprises fared better — most likely due to greater investment — while small and mid-sized businesses reported making out the best, probably as result of a smaller cloud footprint and less infrastructure complexity.

Respondents named data breaches, data leaks, and intrusions into their environment among the most severe incidents they had knowledge of. The risk isn’t going away either, 25 percent of respondents worry they’ve recently suffered a cloud data breach but are unaware of it, while 58 percent of both security pros and developers believe that the risk of a cloud data breach at their organization will only increase over the next year.

77 percent of organizations cite problems with poor training and collaboration as a major challenge to be addressed, while 45 percent see demand for engineering resources as the biggest impact of inefficient cloud security.

You can get the full report from the Snyk site.

Image credit: VitalikRadko/depositphotos.com